drug trafficking

Saudi executes Pakistani for drug trafficking

Saudi authorities executed a Pakistani man on Sunday for attempting to smuggle drugs into the ultra-conservative kingdom, the interior ministry said.
Up to 129 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia so far this year, including the latest execution, compared with 87 for the whole of 2014, according to AFP tallies.
Mohammed Sharif was arrested while attempting to smuggle heroin into the country hidden in his stomach, the ministry said in a statement published on the SPA state news agency.
He was executed in the Quwaiya district, near Riyadh.
Most people sentenced to death in Saudi Arabia are beheaded, but sometimes executions are carried out by firing squad.
Amnesty International on Tuesday appealed for a moratorium on executions in Saudi Arabia, criticising the kingdom’s “deeply flawed judicial system”.
Under Saudi Arabia’s strict Islamic legal code, drug trafficking, murder, armed robbery, rape, homosexuality and apostasy are all punishable by death.
Amnesty says Saudi Arabia is one of the world’s most prolific executioners, along with China, Iran, Iraq and the United States.
Source: Agence France-Presse, August 31, 2015

 

Saving Mary Jane

With just minutes to spare, Filipina Mary Jane Veloso escaped death by an Indonesian firing squad that executed eight other foreigners found guilty of drug trafficking.

Her lawyers argue Mary Jane is not a criminal but a victim of human trafficking. Like so many other Filipino workers forced to leave home to find work, they say she was poor, vulnerable and deceived. And if they can save her, they may be able to save others like her facing death row.

101 East investigates the case of Mary Jane as her family and supporters fight to bring her home.

Follow 101 East here:
Facebook: http://facebook.com/101east
Twitter: http://twitter.com/aj101east
Instagram: http://instagram.com/aj101east
Homepage: http://aljazeera.com/programmes/101east

Source: 101 East, August 20, 2015

Saudi executes Syrian for drug trafficking

Saudi Arabia on Thursday beheaded a Syrian for drug trafficking, bringing to 108 the total number of executions this year, the interior ministry announced.
Qassem Mohammed al-Hilal had been convicted of importing a “large amount of amphetamine pills” into the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom, said a ministry statement carried by state news agency SPA. Authorities resumed executions.
Authorities resumed executions last week after a pause for the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan and the Eid al-Fitr holiday that followed it.
The number of locals and foreigners put to death this year is up sharply from 87 during the whole of 2014, according to AFP tallies.
But this year’s figure is below the record 192 that human rights group Amnesty International said took place in 1995.
Human Rights Watch has accused Saudi authorities of waging a “campaign of death”.
Echoing the concerns of other activists, the New York-based group said it had documented “due process violations” in the legal system that make it difficult for defendants to get fair trials even in capital cases.
Under the kingdom’s strict Islamic sharia legal code, drug trafficking, rape, murder, armed robbery , homosexuality and apostasy are all punishable by death.
The interior ministry has cited deterrence as a reason for carrying out the punishment. It has also talked of “the physical and social harm” caused by drugs.
Source: Agence France-Presse, July 31, 2015

Second Saudi execution after Ramadan pause

july 28, 2015

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia beheaded one of its citizens for drug trafficking Tuesday, in the second execution after a pause for Ramadan.
Saif al-Hadissane was found guilty of smuggling a large amount of hashish.
He was executed in the Al-Ahsa region of eastern Saudi Arabia, the Interior Ministry said in a statement carried by the official Saudi Press Agency.
SPA had reported no executions during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and the Eid al-Fitr holiday which followed it from July 17.
The latest beheading brings to 104 the number of executions in the kingdom this year, a sharp increase on the 87 recorded during the whole of 2014, according to AFP tallies.
This year’s figure is still below the record 192 which human rights group Amnesty International said took place in 1995.
Human Rights Watch has accused Saudi authorities of waging a “campaign of death” by executing more people in the first six months of this year than in all of last year.
Echoing the concerns of other activists, the New York-based group said it had documented “due process violations” in Saudi Arabia’s legal system that make it difficult for defendants to get fair trials even in capital cases.
Under the conservative kingdom’s strict Islamic sharia legal code, drug trafficking, rape, murder, armed robbery, homosexuality and apostasy are all punishable by death.
The Interior Ministry has cited deterrence as a reason for carrying out the punishment. It has also talked of “the physical and social harm” caused by drugs.
Source: Agence France-Presse, July 28, 2015

Indonesia says Frenchman on death row has exhausted all options in fight against execution

June 25, 2015

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s Foreign Ministry says a French citizen sentenced to death for drug offenses has exhausted all options in his legal fight to avoid execution.

Ministry spokesman Aarmanatha Nasir said Thursday that Indonesia will proceed with its legal process “in accordance with the sentence that has been imposed against the convict.”

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius has said his government is “totally mobilized” in support of Serge Atlaoui, whose final appeal was denied by an Indonesian court last week.

Nasir said Indonesia recognizes that governments have an obligation to protect their citizens when they get in trouble abroad but they must do so in compliance with local laws.

Indonesia has executed 14 people, mostly foreigners, for drug trafficking this year.

(associed press)

American gets death sentence for drug trafficking in Vietnam; Press: Officials found heroin hidden in his underwear

April 23, 2014

State media say a court in Vietnam has sentenced an American to death for heroin trafficking.

The Liberated Saigon newspaper says Jason Dinh, 41, was convicted of trafficking 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of heroin at a one-day trial by Ho Chi Minh City’s People’s Court on Tuesday.

The paper said Wednesday that Dinh was arrested last June after customs officials found the heroin hidden in his underwear as he was boarding a flight from Ho Chi Minh City to Australia.

The report quoted the indictment as saying Dinh was hired by an unidentified man to carry the heroin for $30,000.

Court officials were not available for comment Wednesday.

Vietnam has some of the world toughest drug laws, where possessing or trafficking 100 gram of heroin carries the death penalty.

(source: KRMG news)

Govt Tries to Rescue Bulgarians on Death Row in Malaysia

NOVEMBER 5, 2012 http://www.novinite.com

Bulgaria’s Foreign Ministry will attempt to rescue the two Bulgarians recentlysentenced to death for drug trafficking in Malaysia, it has been made clear.

Angel Orbetsov, head of the Asia, Australia and Oceania Directorate at theBulgarian Foreign Ministry, is to arrive on  Monday in Kuala Lumpur, where he will meet with representatives of Malaysia‘s Foreign Ministry, according to the Bulgarian National Television.

Orbetsov is expected to declare that Bulgaria and the rest of the EU do not support the death penalty as a judicial measure.

On May 18, 2011, Bulgarian nationals Georgi Georgiev, Ivan Kostov, and Georgi Bakalov were arrested at the Sultan Ismail International Airport in Johor Bahru,Malaysia, on drug trafficking charges.

Due to the lack of evidence for his involvement into the crime, Georgi Georgiev was released and deported to Bulgaria.

Kostov and Bakalov were sentenced to death at the end of October. They insist they were unaware they were transporting illegal drugs, and were told the package included Viagra and other pills.

A total of 900 people are currently on death row in Malaysia, with the last deathpenalty actually carried out in the country being in the distant 1986.

On Saturday, Bulgarian Foreign Minister Nikolay Mladenov noted that Bulgaria‘s interference in the case is triggered only by the death penalty, not by the guilt or the lack of guilt of the two Bulgarians.